A Titanic Stellar Collision that Rattles Space and time is Discovered by Hubble

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By Nandini Sharma

They cause gravitational waves, a phenomenon that can be detected by detectors on Earth's surface, to ripple the very fabric of time and space.

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Image Credit - Google

After the collision, a blast of radiation was released at a speed that was almost as fast as light, slamming into the material around the destroyed couple.

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Image Credit - Google

Hubble and radio telescopes measured the blob's course with the same precision as measuring a 12-inch pizza on the Moon from Earth.

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Image Credit - Google

A titanic collision between two neutron stars blasted a jet through space faster than 99.97% the speed of light, according to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

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Image Credit - Google

Gravitational waves and gamma rays were first discovered from a binary neutron star merger.

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Image Credit - Google

70 observatories across the earth and in space observed the aftermath of this merger across the electromagnetic spectrum.

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Image Credit - Google

When the neutron stars collided into a black hole, its powerful gravity began to pull matter in its direction.

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Image Credit - Google

Even though the explosion happened in 2017, it took scientists years to study Hubble and other telescope data to paint this comprehensive image.

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Image Credit - Google

For extremely long baseline interferometry, the Hubble observation was combined with data from several National Science Foundation radio telescopes (VLBI)

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Image Credit - Google

According to the Hubble measurement, the jet was moving at a speed that was seven times the speed of light.

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Image Credit - Google

Hubble and VLBI measurements from 2018 enhance the relationship between neutron star mergers and short-duration gamma-ray bursts.

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Hubble and other observatories measured Type Ia supernovae, while ESA's Planck spacecraft measured the Cosmic Microwave Background.

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Image Credit - Google